Category: Publications

Publications

National Association of Medical Examiners Inspection and Accreditation Policies and Procedures

The National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) Inspection and Accreditation (I&A) Program has the explicit purpose of improving the quality of the forensic/medicolegal investigation of death. The accreditation standards emphasize policies and procedures, not professional work product. The accreditation standards represent minimum standards for an adequate medicolegal death investigation system, not guidelines.
Publications

Project FORESIGHT Annual Report, 2021-2022

Project FORESIGHT is a business-guided self-evaluation of forensic science laboratories across the globe. The participating laboratories represent local, regional, state, and national agencies. Economics, accounting, finance, and forensic faculty provide assistance, guidance, and analysis. Laboratories participating in Project FORESIGHT have developed standardized definitions for metrics to evaluate work processes, linking financial information to work tasks, and functions. Laboratory managers can then assess resource allocations, efficiencies, and value of services—the mission of Project FORESIGHT is to measure, preserve what works, and change what does not [Description provided by the WVU website].
Publications

Forensic Genetic Genealogy Laboratory Considerations and Technology Limitations

The application of forensic genetic genealogy (FGG) has technological limitations and will not resolve every case. By taking the time to thoroughly evaluate cases and associated evidence with both local crime laboratory representatives and FGG vendor laboratory representatives, law enforcement investigators can greatly increase the chances of attaining successful case resolutions with FGG. This brief provides the SAKI TTA Team’s guidance on evidence submission based on current successes seen within the field and suggested questions to consider when choosing a FGG laboratory vendor [Description provided by the SAKI TTA website].
Publications

Human Forensic DNA Analysis Process Map

The Human Forensic DNA Analysis Process Map is intended to be used to help improve efficiencies while reducing errors, highlight gaps where further research or standardization would be beneficial, and assist with training new examiners. It may also be used to develop specific laboratory policies and identify best practices [Description provided by the NIST Human Forensic DNA Analysis Process Map].
Publications

National Best Practices for Improving DNA Laboratory Process Efficiency

DNA forensic laboratories are at a crossroads. Faced with a rising demand for analysis and constrained by limited financial resources, laboratories must find new and innovative ways to reduce backlogs and increase productivity. The recommendations in this National Institute of Justice-produced guide, authored by experts in forensic science and laboratory management, are aimed at improving efficiency in a multitude of essential tasks that DNA forensic laboratories routinely perform. These tasks range from hiring and training personnel to formulating and enforcing case acceptance policies, implementing existing and new technologies and methodologies, managing casework and tracking laboratory workflows, analyzing data, and compiling final reports that nonscientists can comprehend. This guide’s recommendations are also designed to help laboratories anticipate changes — including technological advances and new legislation — that may affect their caseloads [Description provided by the NIJ website].
Publications

Medical Examiner and Coroner Offices, 2018

This report provides data on the personnel, budget, workload, and policies of medical examiner and coroner offices in the United States. The report details the number and type of personnel employed, staff certification, and training. It includes the number of cases referred to and accepted by medical examiner and coroner offices, the number of autopsies conducted, and the number of decedents with unidentified remains on record, including the percentage from which DNA evidence has been collected. Findings are based on data from BJS’s 2018 and 2004 Census of Medical Examiner and Coroner Offices [Description provided by the BJS website].
Publications

Report to Congress: Needs Assessment of Forensic Laboratories and Medical Examiner/Coroner Offices

This report, which was mandated by The Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016, details the results of a national needs assessment of forensic science service providers conducted in 2017 and 2018. The needs assessment focused on services provided by forensic laboratories, medical examiner and coroner offices, and other forensic science service providers. As forensic analyses have expanded and become more sensitive, and as practitioners have established more evidence-based policies and capabilities, the broad demand for forensics has grown. Forensic laboratories and medical examiner and coroner offices are constantly working to address the needs of the field, balancing operational priorities to meet stakeholder requests while introducing innovative solutions to solve emerging criminal justice questions. This needs assessment compiled demonstrative evidence of how the field is adapting to advancements in technology, the volume and types of forensic evidence, and the evolving needs of the justice system [Description provided by the NIJ website].